DECEMBER IS FOR REMEMBERING #15/24

Even by my second year as a junior high English teacher at the parochial school that hired me, my excitement over my job hadn’t diminished. But what had dwindled was my energy, especially as the holiday season approached.

  • IMG_0302.JPG
  • I came late to teaching. At almost 40 I was full of ideas and an abundance of enthusiasm. This job represented a long journey from my previous life first as a secretary and later as a mom and I loved it. While nothing beat being a mother, never before had I had such a sense of instant gratification.

    Even by my second year as a junior high English teacher at the parochial school that hired me, my excitement over my job hadn’t diminished. But what had dwindled was my energy, especially as the holiday season approached.

    December is a big deal for just about all kids, and kids in a Catholic school, I suspect, feel it even more strongly.  Even with my classroom doors shut it was easy to hear the school choirs and the junior. high orchestra as they practiced for the annual holiday concert. The little kids went from classroom to classroom singing “Frosty the Snowman” and “Jingle Bells.” The student council, for which I was advisor, handled the choosing of names for Secret Santa. Excitement was palpable for the day of the “great unveil.”

    Keeping a rein on a bunch of hormoning adolescents was no easy task; after all there were still grammar and literature lessons to be mastered.

    Add to that my at-home preparations: baking, decorating the house, shopping for gifts. (Remember, on-line shopping hadn’t yet been invented). My husband remarked one evening as I lay close to comatose in a recliner that I was looking a bit more than tired.

    And I was tired. But I was having a ball. Nonetheless my fatigue must have been apparent to more than just my husband. At our December faculty meeting-cum-party, I opened an elegantly wrapped gift from my own Secret Santa (whom I later learned was Sara Sampair, phy-ed teacher exemplar).

    A tiny rocking chair; what better reminder to slow down and take it easy!

    Even now, while I’ve scaled down my holiday baking, decorating, and entertaining by at least 90%, I find that it’s too easy for me to overdo…except when I spy that little rocking chair and remind myself of Sara’s important lesson: Slow Down!

Author: Judy Westergard

Retired English teacher, self-taught painter, inveterate reader and still lovin' my Kindle!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s